About Us

HISTORY

Willow Fork Drainage District (WFDD or the “District”) was created by an Order of the Texas Water Commission, predecessor to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), on February 20, 1985, to finance the acquisition and construction of major outfall drainage facilities, trunk storm sewer facilities, and related drainage projects. The District has financed its construction of those drainage facilities with the proceeds from unlimited tax bonds. The District also has the power to construct, operate, manage, and finance public park and recreational facilities and has adopted a Parks Master Plan also being financed with proceeds from unlimited tax bonds, as authorized by voters for such purpose.

LOCATION

Located approximately 25 miles west of the central business district of the City of Houston, Texas, and approximately 2.5 miles south of the intersection of Interstate Highway 10 and Mason Road, WFDD covers approximately 5,718 acres of land, of which approximately 5,247 are located within Fort Bend County, Texas, and approximately 471 acres are located within Harris County, Texas. The Barker Reservoir and Barker Dam form the eastern and southern boundaries of the District, respectively. The District is located entirely within the exclusive extraterritorial jurisdiction of the City of Houston. The rights, powers, privileges, authority, and functions of the District are established by the general laws of Texas relating to water control and improvement districts, particularly Chapters 49 and 51 of the Texas Water Code.

ORGANIZATION

The District, with an appraised value of more than $4 billion, generally covers the areas known as Cinco Ranch, Kelliwood, Canyon Gate, Falcon Ranch, and Parkway Oaks and contains 13 underlying Municipal Utility Districts (MUDs): Harris-Fort Bend MUD 1, Fort Bend MUD 124, and Cinco Ranch MUDs 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, and 14. Within its approximate 5,700 acres, the District oversees nearly 15 miles of drainage channels, more than 50 miles of storm sewer lines and outfalls, 30 miles of off-street trails (45 when fully complete), and three community parks.